1. vanished:

    Ole Martin Lund Bo - Deceptive Outward Appearance

    Using just wood and paint, Oslo, Norway-based artist Ole Martin Lund Bo created this anamorphic piece of art with a thought-provoking message. This installation seems as if someone just photoshopped those words onto an already existing image. Look at the other pictures (below), however, and you’ll soon realize that the three words have been carefully painting onto the white walls and wood sticks, becoming what seems like random black marks when viewed from different angles.

     
  2. archiemcphee:

    From the Department of Awesome Natural Wonders come these mysterious patterns on the ocean floor off the southern coast of Japan. Japanese scuba diver and photographer Yoji Ookata, who has spent the last 50 years exploring and documenting his underwater discoveries off the coast of Japan, spotted these beautiful and puzzling patterns in the sand, nearly six feet in diameter and 80 feet below sea level, during a dive near Amami Oshima at the southern tip of the country.

    So what happened next? Are these rippling geometric patterns the equivalent of crop circles on the seafloor? Not quite, but the answer is still a good one. Colossal explains:

    “He soon returned with colleagues and a television crew from the nature program NHK to document the origins what he dubbed the “mystery circle.”

    Using underwater cameras the team discovered the artist is a small puffer fish only a few inches in length that swims tirelessly through the day and night to create these vast organic sculptures using the gesture of a single fin. Through careful observation the team found the circles serve a variety of crucial ecological functions, the most important of which is to attract mates. Apparently the female fish are attracted to the hills and valleys within the sand and traverse them carefully to discover the male fish where the pair eventually lay eggs at the circle’s center, the grooves later acting as a natural buffer to ocean currents that protect the delicate offspring. Scientists also learned that the more ridges contained within the sculpture resulted in a much greater likelihood of the fish pairing. To learn more about the circles check out the full scoop over on Spoon and Tamago, and you can see two high resolution desktop photos courtesy of NHK here.”

    Busy little pufferfish boys wooing potential mates by sculpting the sand with their bodies. As far as we’re concerned, that’s pretty awesome!

    [via Colossal]

     
  3.  
  4. wow!!

theaccounts:

CHEMNITZ BUNDESBANK BY José Luis Mateo
via www.spectral-online.de
I’ve had the most difficult time tracking down information on this building. The most I got was from a discussion in Archinect. The text is taken directly from that thread:
“The building is pretty restrained compared to the architect’s other work. The firm is fairly prolific and has a lot of built work. The facade is made of thin layers of alabaster slab sandwiched between three plates of glass; some interior goodness and details:

also, there’s no intermediate supports for that facade wall; it extends 18.5 m at it’s furthest point on a system of spring loaded tension cables that are regulated by a computer to account for expansion/contraction. Pretty intense. “

    wow!!

    theaccounts:

    CHEMNITZ BUNDESBANK BY José Luis Mateo

    via www.spectral-online.de

    I’ve had the most difficult time tracking down information on this building. The most I got was from a discussion in Archinect. The text is taken directly from that thread:

    “The building is pretty restrained compared to the architect’s other work. The firm is fairly prolific and has a lot of built work.

    The facade is made of thin layers of alabaster slab sandwiched between three plates of glass; some interior goodness and details:









    also, there’s no intermediate supports for that facade wall; it extends 18.5 m at it’s furthest point on a system of spring loaded tension cables that are regulated by a computer to account for expansion/contraction. Pretty intense. “



     
  5.  
  6. 10:23pm Jan 7th 2012


    reblogged: 
    bebon

    ONYX!!! 
subtilitas:

Magén Arquitectos - Martín de Hijar regional headquarters, Hijar 2011. Via.

    ONYX!!! 

    subtilitas:

    Magén Arquitectos - Martín de Hijar regional headquarters, Hijar 2011. Via.

     
  7.  
  8. Poetry Foundation / John Ronan Architects

    i like this!

    (Source: archdaily.com)

     
  9. theantidote:

double orbit by Emma McNally1 
graphite/carbon black/steel nails
(via workman:)

    theantidote:

    double orbit by Emma McNally1 

    graphite/carbon black/steel nails

    (via workman:)

     
  10.  
  11. interesting facade on the addition.

    subtilitas:

    Zecc Archicten’s renovation and addition to a historic home, Driebergen 2010. Completed in conjunction with OPAi, the conversion is the first energy-neutral historic monument in the Netherlands. Through the use of a secondary skin which surrounds portions of the interior and exterior of the house, the design would allow all elements of the renovation to be removed without any damage to the existing structure

     
  12. architizer:

    A cylinder of mirrors dismantle the Parisian sky. “Ring” by Arnaud Lapierre

     
  13. I’ve always loved the quality of light after it passes through water.

    architizer:

    An art installation simulating the inside of a swimming pool in Kanazawa Japan

     
  14.  
  15. If it makes you laugh,
    if it makes you cry,
    if it rips out your heart,
    that’s a good picture.

    -Eddie Adams

    — (via jaytimesthree)